VitaScript Vitamin B-12 Cyanocobolamin 500 mcg (100 tablets)

$11.70

Vitamin B12 is essential for normal energy metabolism of carbohydrates, fat and protein. Vitamin B12 is also required for nucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, methionine synthesis from cysteine, and normal myelin synthesis in the nervous system. Along with vitamin B6 and folic acid, adequate levels of vitamin B12 are required to maintain normal plasma homocysteine levels. Elevated plasma homocysteinemay be an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease.

SKU: 10150 Categories: ,

Description

Vitamin B-12 tablets dissolve rapidly, releasing 500 mcg of pure vitamin B12.

FUNCTIONS

Vitamin B12 is essential for normal energy metabolism of carbohydrates, fat and protein. As a cofactor for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase enzymes, vitamin B12 helps convert odd chain fatty acids and branched chain amino acids into succinyl-CoA, a common citric acid cycle intermediate. Vitamin B12 is also required for nucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, methionine synthesis from cysteine, and normal myelin synthesis in the nervous system. Along with vitamin B6 and folic acid, adequate levels of vitamin B12 are required to maintain normal plasma homocysteine levels. Elevated plasma homocysteinemay be an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease.

There are two distinct mechanisms for intestinal vitamin B12 absorption; receptor-mediated absorption and passive diffusion. In the first, vitamin B12 attaches to a salivary “R-binder” protein which transports it into the small intestine, where vitamin B12 is released. The vitamin then binds to “Intrinsic Factor” (IF), a glycoprotein normally produced by the gastric parietal cells. This vitamin B12-IF complex is carried down to the ileum, where it binds to mucosal receptors.

Finally, the complex is absorbed and bound to serum vitamin B12-binding proteins. The second absorption mechanism, passive diffusion, does not require any carriers, such as B-binder or IF. Only about 1% of free vitamin B12 is passively absorbed, but this can be nutritionally significant with higher dietary vitamin B12 intakes.

The elderly, HIV/AIDS patients, and strict vegetarians are often at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency, either due to low dietary intake or impaired absorption. The receptor-mediated absorption pathway is subject to numerous genetic and pathologic defects which can severely impair normal vitamin B12 absorption. These defects include hereditary absence of IF production, gastric atrophy, gastrectomy, and small intestinal disorders affecting the ileum, such as gluten-induced enteropathy, regional enteritis, chronic diarrhea, and intestinal resection. Affected individuals depend almost exclusively on the passive diffusion pathway, which requires high dietary vitamin B12 intakes.

INDICATIONS

Vitamin B-12 tablets may be a useful nutritional adjunct for individuals who wish to increase their intake of vitamin B12.

FORMULA (WW #10150)

1 Tablet Contains:

  • Vitamin B-12 ……………………………………………..500 mcg
    (as cyanocobalamin)

Other Ingredients: magnesium stearate, cellulose gum, vegetable stearin, dicalcium phosphate, modified cellulose, and silica.

This product contains NO added sugar, salt, dairy, yeast, gluten, wheat, corn, soy, preservatives, artificial colors or flavors.

SUGGESTED USE

As a dietary supplement, adults take one (1) tablet daily with meals, or as directed by a healthcare professional.

SIDE EFFECTS

No adverse effects have been reported.

STORAGE

Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct light. Keep out of reach of children.

REFERENCES

  1. Boushey CJ, Beresford SAA, Omenn GS, Motulsky AG. A quantitative assessment of plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for vascular disease – Probable benefits of increasing folic acid intakes. JAMA 1995;274:1049-1057.
  2. Curtis D, Sparrow R, Brennan L, Van Der Weyden MB. Elevated serum homocysteine as a predictor for vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Eur J Haematol 1994;52:227-232.
  3. Ehrenpreis ED, Carlson SJ, Boorstein HL, Craig RM. Malabsorption and deficiency of vitamin B12 in HIV-infected patients with chronic diarrhea. Dig Dis Sci 1994;39:2159-2162.
  4. Flynn MA, Irvin W, Krause G. The effect of folate and cobalamin on osteoarthritic hands. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13:351-356.
  5. Harriman GR, Smith PD, Horne MK, et al. Vitamin B12 malabsorption in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Arch Intern Med 1989;149:2039-2041.
  6. Herzlich BC, Schiano TD. Reversal of apparent AIDS dementia complex following treatment with vitamin B12. J Intern Med 1993;233:495-497.
  7. Herzlich BC, Schiano TD, Moussa Z, et al. Decreased intrinsic factor secretion in AIDS: relation to parietal cell acid secretory capacity and vitamin B12 malabsorption. Am J Gastroenterol 1992;87:1781-1788.
  8. Rauma AL, Törrönen R, Hänninen O, Mykkänen H. Vitamin B-12 status of long-term adherents of a strict uncooked vegan diet (“living food diet”) is compromised. J Nutr 1995;125:2511-2515.
  9. Saltzman JR, Kemp JA, Golner BB, Pedrosa MC, Dallal GE, Russell RM. Effect of hypochlorhydria due to omeprazole treatment or atrophic gastritis on protein-bound vitamin B12 absorption. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13:584-591.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.